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Dr. Jane M. Geaney
Dr. Jane M. Geaney
Professor of Religious Studies
Profile
Grants and Fellowships

Major Research Grants and Fellowships

National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Fellowship (Summer 2012).

American Council of Learned Societies (2004–2005).

Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange (2004–2005).

Internal Grants

Faculty Research Grant, University of Richmond (Summer 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2014, 2012, 2010, 2008, 2003).

American Studies Tocqueville Seminar Grant, University of Richmond (Summer 2010).

First-Year Seminar Faculty Summer Institute, University of Richmond (Summer 2010).

Center for Civic Engagement Grant, University of Richmond (Summer 2008).

PETE Teaching Grant, University of Richmond (Summer 2006).

Presentations

Invited Lectures

“Hearing vs. Seeing: Ranking Modes of Knowing in Early Chinese Texts (c. 500 B.C.E. – 100 C.E.).” Invited paper presented at the University of Toronto, February 2020, Toronto, Canada. 

“Embodied Knowing in Early Chinese Texts.” Invited paper presented at “Chinese Philosophy: Body, Agency, Praxis,” Gettysburg College, February 2019, Gettysburg PA. 

“(Re)thinking through Early Chinese Senses.” Invited paper presented at “In the Realm of the Senses: Mapping China’s Modern Sensorium,” University of Edinburgh, June 2018, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

“Vision (and Buddhism?) in the Development of an Early Chinese Metalinguistic Term.” Invited paper presented at “Vision and Visuality in Buddhism and Beyond,” University of Zurich, November 2016, Zurich, Switzerland.

“The Prehistory of a Metalinguistic Term: Implicit Assumptions about 義 in Early Chinese Texts.” Invited paper presented at “Philosophy of the Past: Early Chinese Philosophy in Context,” Graduate Workshop, Princeton University, February 2014, Princeton, NJ. 

“Embodied Language and Early Chinese Texts.” Invited paper presented at the Center for East Asian Languages and Civilizations’ 15th Annual Herlee Creel Workshop, University of Chicago, May 2009, Chicago, IL.

“Grounding ‘Language’ in the Senses: What the Eyes and Ears Reveal about Míng 名 in Early Chinese Texts.” Invited paper presented at Harvard University China Humanities (Humanities Center) Seminar, February 2007, Cambridge, MA. 

“Conceptions of ‘Language’ in Early China: the Relation of Speech to Writing.” Invited paper presented at University of Hong Kong Philosophy Department Seminar Series, April 2005, Hong Kong. 

“Above and Below, Within and Without, Far and Near: The Rhetoric of Circumscription in Early Chinese Texts.” Invited paper presented at the “Conference on Chinese Rhetoric,” University of Pennsylvania, May 2004, Philadelphia, PA. 

Conference Papers

“Movement and Ming 名” (A Response to “Incongruent Names: A Theme in the History of Chinese Philosophy,” by Paul J. D’Ambrosio, Hans-Rudolf Kantor, and Hans-Georg Moeller.) Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association: Eastern Division, January 2020, Philadelphia, PA 

“A Language Crisis? Early Chinese Metalinguistic Terms from a Comparative Perspective.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association: Eastern Division, December 2014, Philadelphia, PA.

“Zheng Xuan’s Míng 名 (Names): The Paradox of Claiming that Míng Formerly Referred to Writing.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association: Eastern Division, December 2006, Washington, D.C.

Confucianism and Law. Respondent for a panel at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, November 2005, Philadelphia, PA. 

“The Gendered Feature of Parental Love in Early Confucian Philosophy.” Paper presented at the “Conference on Love—East and West,” Academie du Midi, June 2004, Alet-les- Bains, France. 

“‘Aspect-Perception’ in Early Chinese Thought.” Paper presented at the “Conference on Perception of Bodily Sensation and Emotions in South and East Asian Cultures,” May 2004, Venice, Italy. 

“Shame and its Metaphors in Early Confucian Ethics.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, November 2003, Atlanta, GA. 

“Shame and Leaky Boundaries in Early Confucian Texts.” Paper presented at the Mid- Atlantic Regional Meeting of the Association for Asian Studies, October 2003, Washington D.C. 

Translation of the Zhongyong. Respondent for a panel at the “David Hall Memorial Conference,” May 2003, San Antonio, Texas. 

“The Feminine and Beastly Nature of Filial Feeding.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Asian Studies Association, March 2003, New York, NY. 

“‘Home-Schooling’ as a Contested Concept in Early Confucianism.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, November 2002, Toronto. 

“Shame and Sensory Excess in Early Chinese Philosophy.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association: Pacific Division, March 2001, San Francisco, CA. 

Responses to Manufacturing Confucianism: Chinese Traditions and Universal Civilization. Panel discussant at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, November 2000, Nashville, TN. 

“The Sensory Experience of Writing in Early Chinese Philosophical Texts.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Asian Studies, March 2000, San Diego, CA. 

“Shame and Sensory Excess in Early Chinese Philosophy.” Paper presented at the Meeting of the East-West Philosophers Conference, January 2000, Honolulu, HI. 

“Audible and Visible Body in the Xunzi.” Paper presented at the Annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies, March 1999, Boston, MA. 

“Mencian Hermeneutics.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, November 1998, Orlando, FL.

“The Mind/Body Problem and Sense Discrimination in Ancient Chinese Thought.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Asian Studies, April 1997, Chicago, IL. 

“Sense Discrimination in Classical China.” Organizer for a panel at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Asian Studies, April 1997, Chicago, IL. 

“Language and Reality in Ancient China.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, November 1996, New Orleans, LA. 

“Mind, Body, and Language in the Mencius.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion, November 1995, Philadelphia, PA.

Institutional Service

University of  Richmond Elected and Appointed Committees

  • Chair, Curriculum Committee, 2019–present.
  • Interim Chair, Religious Studies Department, 2017–18
  • Member, Richmond Scholars Steering Committee, 2017–18
  • Member, Planning and Priorities Committee, 2015–2016
  • Member, Dean’s Advisory Council, 2015–2016
  • Member, Grievance Committee, 2014–2017
  • Member, University Scholars Committee, 2014–2016
  • Member, General Education Petitions Committee, 2014–2016
  • Chair, Religious Studies Department, 2010–2013
  • Coordinator, Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, 2008–2010
  • Member, Integrated Academic Enterprise Committee of the Strategic Plan, 2008
  • Coordinator, Asian Studies Concentration, 2007–2008
  • Chair, Curriculum Committee, Fall 2008
  • Member, Curriculum Committee, 2007–2010
  • Member, Faculty Research Committee, 2002–2006
  • Member, University Scholars Committee, 2001–2003

 Professional

  • Reviewer, book manuscript for Chinese University Press, 2018
  • Tenure Reviewer, Whittier University, 2017
  • Grant Reviewer, National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipends, 2015
  • Tenure Reviewer, Fairfield University, 2009
  • Ad hoc Reviewer, Philosophy East & West, Dao: A Journal of Chinese Philosophy, and Asia Major.
  • Steering Committee Member, “Confucian Traditions,” American Academy of Religion, 2001–2006
  • Reviewer, book manuscript for SUNY Press, 2005
  • Reviewer, grant project for Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2005
  • Co-chair, “Chinese Religions Group,” American Academy of Religion, 1999–2001
Publications
Books

The Emergence of Word-Meaning in Early China: Normative Models for Words. Under contract at SUNY Press Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture, ed. Roger T. Ames.

Language as Bodily Practice in Early China: A Chinese Grammatology. SUNY Press Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture, ed. Roger T. Ames. Forthcoming, March 2018.

On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought. Monograph Series in Asian and Comparative Philosophy, no. 19. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2002.

Articles

On the Epistemology of the Senses, Two Decades Later: Parallels and Hierarchies among the Senses in Texts from Early China (c. 500 B.C.E. – 100 C.E.)” (forthcoming).

“Movement and Ming 名” (A Response to “Incongruent Names: A Theme in the History of Chinese Philosophy,” by Paul J. D’Ambrosio, Hans-Rudolf Kantor, and Hans-Georg Moeller.) Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy (forthcoming).

Míng 名 as ‘Names’ Rather than ‘Words’: Disabled Bodies Speaking Without Acting in Early Chinese Texts,” In Having a Word with Angus Graham: On the First Quarter Century of his Immortality, eds. Carine Defoort and Roger T. Ames. Albany: SUNY Press, March, 2018.

"Binaries in Early Chinese Texts: Locating Entities on Continuums.” International Communication of Chinese Culture (2016): 275–292.

“Five Questions.” In History of Logic in China: 5 Questions, eds. Jeremy Seligman and Liu Fenrong, 157–63. London: Automatic Press/ VIP, VINCE INC, 2015.

Self as Container? Metaphors We Lose By in Understanding Early China.” Antiquorum Philosophia 5 (2011): 11–30.

Guarding Moral Boundaries: Shame in Early Confucianism.Philosophy East and West 54 (2004): 113–42. Translated as “Scham und Übertretung leiblicher Grenzen im frühen Konfuzianismus.” Trans. Marc Hermann et al. minima sinica 2 (2001): 21–37.

“Mencius’ Hermeneutics.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2000): 93–100.

“Chinese Cosmology and Recent Studies in Confucian Ethics: A Review Essay.” Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2000): 451–470.

Critique of A. C. Graham’s Reconstruction of the Neo-Mohist Canons.Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (1999): 1–11.

Chapters

“Míng名 as ‘Names’ Rather than ‘Words’: Disabled Bodies Speaking Without Acting in Early Chinese Texts,” in Having a Word with Angus Graham: On the First Quarter Century of his Immortality, edited by Carine Defoort and Roger T. Ames. Albany: SUNY Press (March 2018).

“What is Míng 名? ‘Name’ not ‘Word’.” In Dao: A Companion to Chinese Philosophy of Logic, ed. Yiu-ming Fung. New York: Springer (December 2019).

The Sounds of Zhèngmíng (正名): Setting Names Straight in Early Chinese Texts.” In Ethics in Early China: An Anthology, edited by Chris Fraser, Dan Robins, and Timothy O’Leary, 107–118. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2011.

The Gendered Feature of Parental Love in Early Confucian Philosophy.” In Philosophieren über die Liebe. Love in Eastern and Western Philosophies, ed. Hans-Georg Moeller and Gunter Wohlfart, 99–113. Berlin: Parerga, 2007.

The Limits of the Senses in the Zhongyong.” In Metaphilosophy and Chinese Thought: Interpreting David Hall, ed. Ewing Chinn and Henry Rosemont Jr., 149–65. New York: Global Scholarly Publications, 2005.

Reviews

Effortless Action: Wu-wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China, by Edward Slingerland. Journal of Chinese Religions 31 (2003): 294–295.

The Way of Water and Sprouts of Virtue, by Sarah Allan. Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (2000): 304–305.

Sharing the Light: Representations of Women and Virtue in Early China, by Lisa Raphals. Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (2000): 140–141.

Mencius and Early Chinese Thought, by Kwong-loi Shun. Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (1999): 366–368.

Naming and Actuality in Early Chinese Thought, by John Makeham. Journal of Religion 78 (1998): 153–154.

Education
Ph.D., University of Chicago 1996
Comparative Philosophy of Religion
M.A., University of Chicago 1986
Religious Studies
B.A., College of Holy Cross 1984
English
Contact Information
102D Weinstein Hall
(804) 289-8330
(804) 287-6504 (Fax)
Areas of Expertise
Conceptions of the body and language in early Chinese texts